How to Welcome a New Employee to Your Business

How To Welcome a New Employee
5
min read
October 21, 2020

For any business owner, hiring a new employee is an exciting milestone. Not only are you adding a new perspective and skillset to your roster, but it’s also an indication that business is booming. But for some new employees, the stress doesn't sink in until after they accept the job offer. Fresh off the heels of numerous interviews, it’s natural for an incoming employee to feel the pressure to fit into the work environment and do their new job to the best of their ability. (After all, nobody wants to make their brand-new boss question hiring them in the first place.) 

To help ease any stress and create a seamless transition, check out this fail-safe guide to welcoming a new hire. From setting them up with payroll, introducing them to their team, to managing expectations, the steps below will help start this big milestone on the right foot. 

Before the First Day 

As the old saying goes, the early bird gets the worm. Though many businesses will begin the onboarding process on an employee’s first day, getting a head-start can make the time spent at the office as efficient as possible. (Plus, it’ll help your new employee feel welcomed and knowledgeable on day one.)

Connect on LinkedIn

After a long, grueling hiring process, you’ve finally found someone who has the skills and experience to become an invaluable addition to your company. So why not make things official? Adding your new employees to your professional network will help them feel like part of the team long before they step inside the office. If you want to go the extra mile, supplement your LinkedIn request with a nice note that expresses how excited you are to work together. It's a small gesture that will go a long way.

Send Over Important Information

Who wants to spend their first day at a new job filling out heaping piles of paperwork? To make day one as productive as possible, send some important paperwork over beforehand. Encourage new employees to check out key documents like your business' benefits information, the employee handbook, and wiki page. That way, your new employee can prepare for their first day of work. 

While you're at it, this is also a good time to collect your new hire's personal information such as their birthday, emergency contact, and mailing address. 

Confirm the Details

A few days before their start date, send your new employee an official welcome letter from your human resources department. This note should confirm their start date and time, the company dress code, and any other pertinent information about the first day. (Consider including: Their desk's location, the day’s schedule, and who they should ask for at reception.) It doesn't matter if you're adding a new member to your C-suite or hiring a recent college graduate: Nobody wants to feel rudderless during their first day at work. Not only will laying out the details help them understand what to expect on day one, but it can also give your new employee a confidence boost. 

Assign Your Employee a Mentor 

As if taking on a new role isn't difficult enough, your incoming employees will need to get acquainted with a completely foreign environment. To help make the acclimation process a breeze, pair your new hire with a mentor. For many employees, a mentor can offer sage advice and help their proteges achieve their goals. However, when it comes to onboarding a new employee, a mentor can also share everything from the best lunch spots to their IT troubleshooting tips. 

Create a Warm Welcome 

Chances are, your new employee is ready to hit the ground running on their first day at work. However, very few things can ruin that momentum like arriving at a partially-functioning cubicle. The week before your new hire starts, ask your IT department to help set up their computer, internet connection, and email account. Before your employee steps foot in the office, make sure their desk is equipped with the following:

Want to make a good first impression? Add a welcome sign or a batch of fresh cookies to your new hire's cubicle.

Day One 

After weeks of anticipation, the big day is finally here! Though completing the onboarding process will inevitably be a big part of your new hire's day, it's important to sprinkle in a few things that will help them feel included in the company culture.

Fill Out Last-Minute Paperwork

Just because you sent your new hire benefits information and your company's employee handbook ahead of time doesn't mean their first day will be free of paperwork. While some forms can be completed ahead of time, a new employee might need to be in the office to register for a security badge or share their payroll information. Start the day on a productive note by having your new employee fill out any last-minute documents. 

Send a Welcome Email 

Adding a new member to your team is exciting, so why not celebrate this milestone with the rest of the company? While your new hire is filling out last-minute paperwork, send a company-wide email welcoming them to the team. Use this email to outline their position, previous information, and their desk’s location. Not only will this email give your new hire a warm welcome, but it will also keep the rest of your employees in the loop.

Take a Tour 

Once your new employee has completed all their paperwork, give them a tour of their new office. Since time is of the essence, you may not be able to show them every nook and cranny; however, it's important to hit up the following places:

Chances are, your new hire won't memorize the office's layout after one quick sweep, but this will help them feel more comfortable in their new surroundings. While you're showing them around the office, introduce your new hire to the coworkers you walk past. This is a great opportunity to connect your new hire with any colleagues they'll work with in the future. 

Schedule a Meeting With Human Resources 

From selecting a suitable benefits package to navigating office conflict, the human resources department is here to support all your employees—yes, including your new hires. On the first day, schedule a meeting between your new hire and the human resources department. Not only does this give your new employee the opportunity to ask any questions about the onboarding process, but it will also position your HR team as a helpful, reliable resource.  

Take Them Out to Lunch 

Instead of having your new hire eat lunch alone—or, even worse, hunched over their computer—treat them to a meal at your favorite spot. While you might be able to recite their resume from memory, now's your chance to get to know your new hire on a personal level. What do they like to do in their free time? Do they have a family or significant other? Do the two of you have any favorite books or television shows in common? Not only will it make a great first impression, but this step will also lay the groundwork for a positive, professional relationship. 

End of the First Week 

Congratulations: Your new hire has made it through their first week on the job! Now that your new employee is getting settled into the office, it's time to put them on the fast-track to success. 

Schedule a Check-In Meeting 

After a few days on the job, schedule a check-in meeting with your new hire. Use this time to see how your new employee is getting acclimated to the company. Don't forget to give your new employee the opportunity to ask any lingering questions. Addressing any questions or concerns now will ensure your employee will be able to do their job as efficiently as possible. 

While a check-in meeting is important for new hires, continue the conversation by scheduling weekly or bi-weekly touch-base appointments. After all, it's important to have positive transparent communication with your direct reports. 

Manage Expectations

Now that your new employee knows the ins and outs of your company, it's time to set expectations. Understandably, this step will differ from job to job. If your new hire works in the sales department, you might want to set goals for 30, 60, and 90 days on the job. Added a new engineer to your team's roster? Introduce them to their department's workflow and recommend any best practices.

At the end of the day, a new hire needs to be able to get the job done, so setting expectations within the first week can let them hit the ground running.

Organize a Team Happy Hour 

Of course, there is more to joining a new company than signing up for benefits and mastering a workflow. Help your new hire feel like part of the team by hosting a group activity. Whether you schedule a group lunch break or a post-work happy hour, organizing team-building events can do wonders for your company culture. Not only will your new hire feel welcomed, but it can also boost employee engagement for seasoned workers.

Let's Wrap it Up

Need to add your new hire to payroll? Download Hourly, which makes onboarding a breeze. Simply text your new employee a link to join Hourly, and they can add in all their information from their phone. Hourly also lets employers create custom rules like enforcing 8-hour days, 30-minute lunches, and setting mandatory start times. That way, you can rest easy knowing your new employee isn’t working overtime to get up to speed. 

Have questions? Reach out at (844) 800-2211 to learn more!


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